Privacy and Charity Fundraising Agencies

It’s dinner time, you’ve just sat down to eat – and the phone rings, it’s one of those pesky callers asking if you can help with a donation for some cause.

You often get these calls and help when you’re able, often without asking any questions; however this time you decide to ask “Are you working directly with xyz or are you with a fundraising agency?” – the caller is silent for a moment then says yes she is with an agency who were supplied with a list of numbers for people who had completed a survey.

Strange, no survey comes to mind, so a few more questions and it transpires that you had donated to another charity the company calls for … privacy alarm bells ring.

If you’ve given your information for one reason, it can’t be used for another – simple.

It’s important to understand privacy principals …

Principle 1Principle 2Principle 3 and Principle 4 govern the collection of personal information. This includes the reasons why personal information may be collected, where it may be collected from, and how it is collected.

Principle 8 and Principle 9Principle 10 and Principle 11 place restrictions on how people and organisations can use or disclose personal information. These include ensuring information is accurate and up-to-date, and that it isn’t improperly disclosed.

See also

Privacy Padlock

PADLOCK: AN EASY CHECKLIST TO HELP GET PRIVACY RIGHT

Privacy is something we all worry about, what’s happening to our information, how can we protect the information of others – this simple guide from the Privacy Commissioner helps make sense of what many see as a complicated issue. More …

PERSONAL INFORMATION – GIVEN FOR ONE REASON, USED FOR ANOTHER

You walk down the street and get confronted by an organization asking you to sign their petition; you do so only to find out down the track that they have used your information for other purposes – how do you feel?

CHARITIES AND THE PRIVACY ACT

Did you know that your organization must comply with the Privacy Act 1993 ? Some organizations are unaware of their requirements under the Act, and how they must deal with, treat personal information collected in the course of their work – more

PADLOCK: an easy checklist to help get privacy right

Privacy is something we all worry about, what’s happening to our information, how can we protect the information of others – this simple guide from the Privacy Commissioner helps make sense of what many see as a complicated issue.

Operating in a privacy-protective way is not hard. It just means that privacy should be your first thought, not an afterthought. 

By building it in at the beginning, privacy becomes a part of how you work. You will be able to anticipate the questions you need to answer, and prevent privacy disasters before they happen.

This PADLOCK poster sets out seven simple ideas. Use these ideas whenever you deal with personal information, and you will be well on the way to building privacy into your everyday business.

Charities and The Privacy Act

Privacy-circle

Did you know that your organization must comply with the Privacy Act 1993 ? 

Some organizations are unaware of their requirements under the Act, and how they must deal with, treat personal information collected in the course of their work (business). 

The Privacy Act 1993 is a relatively simple piece of legislation, there are basic principles which you must comply with – these include: 

Principle 1Principle 2Principle 3 and Principle 4 govern the collection of personal information. This includes the reasons why personal information may be collected, where it may be collected from, and how it is collected. 

Principle 5 governs the way personal information is stored. It is designed to protect personal information from unauthorised use or disclosure. 

Principle 6 gives individuals the right to access information about themselves. 

Principle 7 gives individuals the right to correct information about themselves. 

Principle 8 and Principle 9Principle 10 and Principle 11 place restrictions on how people and organisations can use or disclose personal information. These include ensuring information is accurate and up-to-date, and that it isn’t improperly disclosed. 

Principle 12 governs how “unique identifiers” – such as IRD numbers, bank client numbers, driver’s licence and passport numbers – can be used. 

If you’re not sure about the Privacy Act and your organization – take a look at:  

 Getting Started 

If you still have doubts, questions or concerns contact the Office of The Privacy Commissioner – they are able to offer some training through workshops for those needing more in-depth knowledge/understanding of the Act and it’s implications, your responsibilities etc.

Also – check Keeping It Legal   – a great resource for legislation and other matters that may affect community and voluntary organizations.

 

Source: Image and quotes from Office of The Privacy Commissioner